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Teaching Philosophy


Teaching Philosophy

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Teaching Philosophy


Teaching Philosophy

What the educator does in teaching is to make it possible for the students to become themselves.
— Paulo Friere

I am a engaging teacher for two reasons: I create a learning environment that a student would not have experienced otherwise, through applied fieldwork, guest speakers, and inquiry-based learning; and I bring together a diversity of learners across categories of difference to push the boundaries of individual knowledge. After six years of teaching I believe that intelligence is not fixed and can change over time and with effort.

Courses I teach include, but are not limited to, the following. Scroll down for a sample of full course descriptions.

  • Sustainable Development

  • Socio-ecological Systems and Global Change

  • Gender and Natural Resource Management

  • The Adaptable Human

  • The Environment, Economy, and Society

  • Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

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Sample Syllabi


Sample Courses

Sample Syllabi


Sample Courses

Socio-ecological Systems and Global Change

Systematic study of human-environment relationships has only recently included complexities of climate change. Natural and social scientists have renamed this time on earth the Anthropocene, a new geologic epoch created by human pollution, land use change, and atomic experimentation. This course explores the origins of research in human adaptation, vulnerability, and resilience. The readings and lectures will investigate the tensions between place-based ethnographic evaluations of vulnerability, empirical modeling approaches to resilience research, and how those disciplinary schisms stemmed from, and can productively return to adaptation research. It concludes with three cases that illustrate contention and complexity in agricultural, gendered, and governance adaptations to climate change. 


Feminist Political Ecology

This course is to introduce students of global change to the political ecology framework and feminist thought. In the developing country context, the history of colonial rule has cascading effects across the human-environment nexus. Axes of power, such as gender, class, and race, further complicate access to and distribution of resources. This course begins in the post-colonial era of critical geography, explores feminisms in geographic and environmental thought, and concludes with the contemporary application of such frameworks to gendered dimensions of climate change and developing country socio-ecological systems.


Gender and Natural Resource Management

 

This seminar examines gender in the context of natural resource management. Masculinity and femininity, as social constructs, have been harnessed in the US and international environmental movements. Gender is now a critical topic in climate change impacts, especially in developing countries, due to disproportionate impacts that climate-induced events have on women. To add complexity, gender is only one of many axes of difference that intersect in places, spaces, and humans to form experiences of nature and global change. This is an intensive reading and writing course. Students are asked to draw information from various sources, including original research, to develop a synthesis paper on a particular topic of their own choice.